Project 2: Addressing non-optimal use of resources through valuation and "environmental payments"

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Project 2: Addressing non-optimal use of resources through valuation and "environmental payments"
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Core problem: Unless the relative contributions of various resources that contribute to the productivity of coastal habitats are fully understood, sub-optimal decisions will be made about how they are used. For example, the economic value of mangrove forests as nursery areas yielding large numbers of juvenile fish to supply offshore fisheries may be much greater than their value for timber or fuel. If so, custodians of mangroves should be provided with economic incentives greater than the value of timber and fuel to manage them as fish nurseries. The problem is that the relative contribution of various terrestrial and coastal inputs to the maintenance of inshore ecosystems and fisheries production is not well known. Details of the component and principles involved are presented in Annex C.

Main Activities

  • Identification of resource flows among components contributing to productive coastal ecosystems, including the use of GIS to capture the spatial distribution of economic uses of resources.
  • Rapid agro-biodiversity appraisal (secondary data collection and review of previous and related studies; spatial analysis, stakeholder analysis) within the national park including its buffer zone.
  • Pilot-test sustainable payments by users of biodiversity services for the purpose of conserving biodiversity resources and the services they provide.
  • Review existing policies to assess constraints in the implementation of sustainable financing for biodiversity conservation in the Philippines.
  • Development of policy recommendations for more equitable distribution of the economic benefits of productive coastal ecosystems among owners of the contributing components.

Milestones

Year 1:

  •                     Design of potential PES schemes (in collaboration with key stakeholders) with focus on payments for water and biodiversity services.

Year 2:

  • Policies for equitable distribution of benefits to resource owners, including mechanisms such as   levies on the ultimate harvesters, to compensate owners of vital resources who are not direct   beneficiaries.

Key outputs

  • Assessment of the relative importance of various natural resources supporting productive terrestrial and coastal ecosystems in and around Mt. Malindang National Park.
  • Assessment of the potential (and design) of PES schemes with focus on payments for water and   biodiversity services.
  • Policies for equitable distribution of benefits to resource owners, including mechanisms such as   levies on the ultimate harvesters, to compensate owners of vital resources who are not direct   beneficiaries.
  • Strengthened capacity of intermediary organizations that can broker payments between the local communities and potential buyers. These include interested local NGOs and local government units.

Expected impacts

  • Greater awareness of resources supporting various production systems in the uplands, lowlands, and coastal areas.
  • Reduced silt load of runoff that drains in coastal ecosystems. Siltation is the leading cause of coral reefs destruction in the Philippines
  • More equitable distribution of socio-economic benefits accruing from the use of coastal resources.
  • Greater likelihood that all essential components of productive ecosystems will be safeguarded.
  • Improved awareness of policy makers and other users about the downstream impacts of land-based activities on coastal ecosystem

Project Leader



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